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To our valued customers,

We hope you are well. As the coronavirus (COVID-19) increases its impact on our communities, we want to briefly update you on the steps we’re taking to protect the health and well-being of our employees while continuing to provide exceptional service to our customers as our top priorities.

Our business continuity plans have been well prepared and are being implemented. We are adopting remote work arrangements to support recommended social distancing. Our technology and communication platforms are designed to allow access to our team whether working in our company headquarters or from a remote location. Gas monitor servicing and warranty work may take longer than our usual speedy turnaround, but we will keep you updated if anything changes.

Our website is available 24/7 to support our customers' self-service needs, and our safety experts are available by phone 6am to 4pm PST, Monday – Friday by calling 800-829-9580.







We assure you that we are here to continue to support your needs during these challenging times. Thank you for being our valued customer!

Stay Safe,

The PK Safety Team

Laboratory biosafety guidance related to the novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV)


Novel Coronavirus and COVID-19 Outbreak - 3M Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Considerations

MASK WILL BE MARKED AS SHOWN BELOW 



Top Dust Masks

Protecting your workers from inhaling oil- and non-oil-based particulates is your top priority, and at EnviroSafetyProducts, we understand that. It's not just a matter of OSHA compliance; it's a matter of keeping your workplace safe so your workers stay healthy. Our inventory is packed with N100 and P100 respirators from the most trusted manufacturers, like 3M and Moldex at extremely affordable prices. You can get the protection your employees need and stay in compliance with OSHA standards without going over budget. If you're not sure what N100 or P100 respirator will work best in your workplace, call our expert customer service representatives at 800-637-6606 and they'll point you in the right direction.

N100 Masks

Not all protective respirator masks are the same. N100 masks are designed to protect the wearer from inhaling non-oil-based particulates, and according to OSHA standards, they must prevent 99.97 percent of those particulates from getting in when properly worn. They're ideal for grinding, sanding, mineral processing and other activities that do not involve oil-based hazards. People working on construction sites, in dry food processing areas and in agricultural processing stations can benefit from using N100 respirators. They block dangerous hazards like lead, cadmium, arsenic and methylenedianiline, commonly referred to as MDA. All the N100 masks in EnviroSafetyProducts' catalog are NIOSH-approved.

P100 Masks

P100 respirators are effective at blocking 99.97 percent of oil-based particulates when properly worn. They can protect wearers from exposure to dust, fumes and hazardous mists. P100 masks are ideal for construction environments, food processing plants, agricultural applications and pharmaceutical manufacturing. They also provide complete protection against non-oil-based particulates, like lead, arsenic and cadmium. P100 respirators are often used during welding, as well. Each P100 mask in our inventory meets OSHA and NIOSH standards.

N100 and P100 Masks for Protection against Avian Flu, Swine Flu and Other Diseases The Centers for Disease Control tested N100 and P100 masks for their efficacy against avian flu, swine flu and other contagious diseases and found them to provide superior protection. Since N100 respirators and P100 respirators are capable of blocking the majority of airborne hazards, people often use them to prevent the spread of dangerous diseases.

Proper Use of N100 and P100 Respirators Moldex and 3M respirators, like all other respirators, are ineffective if they aren't used properly. It's important to make sure each employee in your workplace is properly trained to use them for maximum effectiveness. OSHA requires employers to educate their workers on the proper use of all required PPE, so setting up a comprehensive training plan goes hand-in-hand with purchasing top-quality P100 and N100 respirators.

Employees need to know how to seal N100 and P100 masks to their faces, how to use masks in conjunction with other PPE like safety goggles and hearing protection, and how to adjust the masks for maximum comfort.

Which N100 Mask or P100 Mask is Right for Your Workplace? Remember that N100 masks are not rated for protection against oil-based particulates, but P100 respirators are. If you're having a hard time choosing the right respirator for your workplace, just call 800-637-6606. Our customer service representatives are highly trained when it comes to respirators, and they can help you make the most cost-effective, responsible decision.

USE LINKS ABOVE FOR USE - WHEN SHTF SOMETHING IS BETTER THEN NOTHING



3M Respirator Selection Guide

Data for this guide compiled August, 2019
FREE PDF FILE LINK CLICK RED BAR


For a lot of job sites, safety masks and respirators are an essential piece of PPE. The lungs are delicate, important organs that are hard to repair if they get damaged, and inhaling the wrong chemical can have devastating effects on other areas of the body as well. Protect yourself from invisible airborne particles by investing in a respirator or mask suited to your job.

How Masks and Respirators Are Rated The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is a division of the CDC. They determine the ratings that allow people to choose the right mask for the job. Because government agencies determine ratings for masks, purchasing more expensive brand name N95 masks won’t necessarily provide “better” protection.

The ratings are based on a performance standard. Both the filter material and the relative quality of the mask fit are factored into whether a mask earns a particular rating. The challenge in determining this is smoke with 0.3 micron sized particles. How well does the filter media catch these little buggers, and does the mask fit seal off the path for unfiltered air?

Modern filter media uses a built-in static charge to attract and retain particles as they are pulled through. Some grades of filter can have this static charge ruined when in contact with oil mist. The letter in a mask’s name tells you whether or not the mask can resist oil: N masks are not oil resistant, P masks are oil proof, and R masks are oil resistant.

The number in a rating tells you the minimum amount of airborne challenge particles the mask protects against: an N95 mask keeps out at least 95% of particles but isn’t oil resistant, and a P100 mask is oil proof while protecting the wearer from at least 99.8% of particles.

Where to Use Your N95 Masks N95 masks see a lot of use in industrial and construction applications where dust and liquids are a frequent hazard. They’re not suited for areas with lead or asbestos particles, gases, oil-based particulates, aerosols, or some particular healthcare applications: specialized filters, masks, and respirators are needed for those kinds of work. Face masks are meant to be single-use and disposed of after removal, and they’re not meant to be shared.

Can N95 Masks Protect Me from a Virus? The emergence of Wuhan coronavirus (and SARS before that) has a lot of people concerned and stocking up on N95 masks. Viruses and bacteria are generally too small for a mask to protect against, though they are almost always in a droplet from a sneeze or cough. The mask will stop the droplets.

Please also remember that your eyes are another pathway, so glasses or goggles may be prudent. Another good thing about wearing a mask is that it prevents you from touching your nose and mouth! This is a prime route for the spread of viruses.

If you are the infected person, please avoid the masks that have an exhalation valve. They do breathe easier than those without, but they allow unfiltered air to escape the mask, and this may not be what you have in mind.

It’s also recommended that you wear a face mask if you have symptoms and are entering a healthcare facility for treatment, and healthcare professionals would likely benefit from wearing one as well. If you do wear a mask, choose one that can be fitted to your face, and use the same health and hygiene practices you would use to prevent the flu (stay home if you’re sick, wash your hands frequently and thoroughly, avoid close contact with others, and keep the disinfectant handy).

Choosing the right PPE for your workers and job can seem like a daunting prospect, but it’s a necessary one to make sure that everyone stays healthy on the job. PK Safety carries a variety of respirators, face masks, and filters for every worksite need from a variety of trusted brands. Our safety experts can answer your questions about air quality, equipment, and worksite safety online or by phone at 855.469.2728.

Please keep in mind that PK Safety staff are not trained medical professionals and therefore cannot give medical advice. You can find additional information about the Coronavirus from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) by clicking here.

For a lot of job sites, safety masks and respirators are an essential piece of PPE. The lungs are delicate, important organs that are hard to repair if they get damaged, and inhaling the wrong chemical can have devastating effects on other areas of the body as well. Protect yourself from invisible airborne particles by investing in a respirator or mask suited to your job.

How Masks and Respirators Are Rated The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is a division of the CDC. They determine the ratings that allow people to choose the right mask for the job. Because government agencies determine ratings for masks, purchasing more expensive brand name N95 masks won’t necessarily provide “better” protection.

The ratings are based on a performance standard. Both the filter material and the relative quality of the mask fit are factored into whether a mask earns a particular rating. The challenge in determining this is smoke with 0.3 micron sized particles. How well does the filter media catch these little buggers, and does the mask fit seal off the path for unfiltered air?

Modern filter media uses a built-in static charge to attract and retain particles as they are pulled through. Some grades of filter can have this static charge ruined when in contact with oil mist. The letter in a mask’s name tells you whether or not the mask can resist oil: N masks are not oil resistant, P masks are oil proof, and R masks are oil resistant.

The number in a rating tells you the minimum amount of airborne challenge particles the mask protects against: an N95 mask keeps out at least 95% of particles but isn’t oil resistant, and a P100 mask is oil proof while protecting the wearer from at least 99.8% of particles.

Where to Use Your N95 Masks N95 masks see a lot of use in industrial and construction applications where dust and liquids are a frequent hazard. They’re not suited for areas with lead or asbestos particles, gases, oil-based particulates, aerosols, or some particular healthcare applications: specialized filters, masks, and respirators are needed for those kinds of work. Face masks are meant to be single-use and disposed of after removal, and they’re not meant to be shared.

Can N95 Masks Protect Me from a Virus? The emergence of Wuhan coronavirus (and SARS before that) has a lot of people concerned and stocking up on N95 masks. Viruses and bacteria are generally too small for a mask to protect against, though they are almost always in a droplet from a sneeze or cough. The mask will stop the droplets.

Please also remember that your eyes are another pathway, so glasses or goggles may be prudent. Another good thing about wearing a mask is that it prevents you from touching your nose and mouth! This is a prime route for the spread of viruses.

If you are the infected person, please avoid the masks that have an exhalation valve. They do breathe easier than those without, but they allow unfiltered air to escape the mask, and this may not be what you have in mind.

It’s also recommended that you wear a face mask if you have symptoms and are entering a healthcare facility for treatment, and healthcare professionals would likely benefit from wearing one as well. If you do wear a mask, choose one that can be fitted to your face, and use the same health and hygiene practices you would use to prevent the flu (stay home if you’re sick, wash your hands frequently and thoroughly, avoid close contact with others, and keep the disinfectant handy).

Choosing the right PPE for your workers and job can seem like a daunting prospect, but it’s a necessary one to make sure that everyone stays healthy on the job. PK Safety carries a variety of respirators, face masks, and filters for every worksite need from a variety of trusted brands. Our safety experts can answer your questions about air quality, equipment, and worksite safety online or by phone at 800.829.9580.

Please keep in mind that PK Safety staff are not trained medical professionals and therefore cannot give medical advice. You can find additional information about the Coronavirus from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) by clicking here.



Laboratory biosafety manual
Third edition

Free PDF

NIOSH  - NPPTL - Respirator CDC SITE



NIOSH-Approved Respirators Information